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The bigger plan of my Amiga-Javascript projects

The past years I have been slowly tinkering on various Amiga Projects.
Mostly in JavaScript, mostly to unlock various parts of the huge Amiga ecosystem: parsing ancient filesystems and fileformats, reading and writing Amiga files with new tools, ...

Slowly all these various tidbits are coming together in the big plan: to break the Amiga out of it's emulated container and to seamlessly integrate in a modern OS.

That modern OS is platform independent. It runs on everything and it is accessible from everywhere.
For me, this translated to an OS that is web based. It runs in your browser and it lives in the cloud.

There have been many approaches to such an OS, some of them - like FriendUP - clearly have their roots in the Amiga system.
One of the most interesting ones is Amibian.js. It's also inspired by the Amiga and it runs in javaScript: Node.js on the backend, browser in front.

I've been talking with Jon - the creator of Amibian.js.
It's a HUGELY ambitious project, ranging from custom compilers in various programming languages to a recreation of an Amiga-like OS, complete with compatible system library calls and more.

When doing a modern Amiga inspired OS, one of the big questions is how you handle legacy software.
The Amiga has an old but super mature ecosystem of programs but sadly all that software doesn't run anymore on modern systems.
The solution is to emulate that old hardware so you can still run all that old software.
The most used Amiga Emulator is WinUAE, a glorious and ultra-advanced piece of code.
Rupert Hausberger did the daunting task of porting it to javascript.

The drawback of emulating an Amiga is that it is a contained black-box system that has no knowledge of the larger system it's running on. WinUAE handles this quite elegantly by allowing a shared filesystem, but in your browser there's no such thing.

This is where I stepped in: an emulated boxed Amiga running in your browser is cool, but wouldn't it be even cooler to break it open?
You could use Amiga software to seamless edit/play your local files,
or launch modern non-Amiga tools from within the Amiga,
or compile a program for Amiga with today's tools and launch it directly on an emulated 68k CPU
or ....

All this directly available on whatever system you use and wherever you are.

In the end, the underlying technicalities shouldn't matter.
It shouldn't matter what OS a program was written for, or where your files are exactly, or even who's physical machine you are using. Just launch your space and mold it to your liking.

Amibian.js already tries to break the barriers between the browser and your local system.
Browser or native? It shouldn't matter.

I will gladly help and try to break the barriers between the emulated environments and the native ones:
Emulated or native? It shouldn't matter.
 
The top video is a first demo of the progress. It shows various aspects of building such a system.
Most notably a shared filesytem so both systems (emulated and native) can access the same files.

Everything you see is running in the browser.
The (emulated) Amiga is on the right, the host system is on the left.
We're still doing babysteps: trying out stuff and laying the foundation for the bigger plan.

The concept is always the same: a seamless integration where it doesn't matter anymore where your files are or on what platform your program is running on.